Guillermo Pacheco

Guillermo Pacheco is an artist formed outside the academy, from his childhood he remembers the petroglyphs in the river where he played as a kid. Here he saw“The Santo’s Stone” , which is a big granite rock hand carved to represent the fauna, fishing and corn; elements of the origin.

He recalls his discovery prompted by watching while as his father plowed the ground. The lines formed would have figures appear such as deformed faces, boars, snakes in spirals, birds, and deer.

“I grew up with the oral traditions that my grandfather would tell us about imaginary quimeras that lived upstream where animals out of this world lived. Big turtles similar to the ones carved in the stone with concentric lines. Those are the motifs that stuck to my memory.”

Archaeology trapped his attention since he was a teen, and he would work years later at the Monte Alban project with the archaeologist Marcus Winter. The stratigraphic cuts in the site lead him to understand that the Fibonacci proportion was incorporated into every corner and carved rock in the representation of Qutzaltcoatl inside the pyramids.

This is how prehispanic arquitectures became a fundamental part of the development of his themes and it guided his preference for monumental compositions. The restoration of mural painting influenced the materials he learned, such as tempera and encaustic, which were fundamental techniques in the XVI century. Another influence was ovohispanic architecture worked by craftsmen,goldsmiths , stonemasons,and indigenous painters have guided his designs at Santo Domingo de Gizmán, at the tla Verde Antequera in Oaxaca.

“I remember the zoomorphic figures on the walls of the convents, animals that looked like quimeras, saltimbanquis with flowers and baroque ornaments.”

“The people that come from indigenous communities learn about ancient cosmogonies, ancient beliefs and oral traditions regarding the water, the land, and the agriculture set the rhythm of life. They teach us along with the teachings of the old Tlacuilos, that wisdom is marked by the stars, it resonates like an echo of the landscapes and the water.”

La Ladrillera
La Ladrillera
Hierve el Agua
Hierve el Agua

Guillermo Pacheco

La Ladrillera
La Ladrillera
Hierve el Agua
Hierve el Agua

Guillermo Pacheco is an artist formed outside the academy, from his childhood he remembers the petroglyphs in the river where he played as a kid. Here he saw“The Santo’s Stone” , which is a big granite rock hand carved to represent the fauna, fishing and corn; elements of the origin.

He recalls his discovery prompted by watching while as his father plowed the ground. The lines formed would have figures appear such as deformed faces, boars, snakes in spirals, birds, and deer.

“I grew up with the oral traditions that my grandfather would tell us about imaginary quimeras that lived upstream where animals out of this world lived. Big turtles similar to the ones carved in the stone with concentric lines. Those are the motifs that stuck to my memory.”

Archaeology trapped his attention since he was a teen, and he would work years later at the Monte Alban project with the archaeologist Marcus Winter. The stratigraphic cuts in the site lead him to understand that the Fibonacci proportion was incorporated into every corner and carved rock in the representation of Qutzaltcoatl inside the pyramids.

This is how prehispanic arquitectures became a fundamental part of the development of his themes and it guided his preference for monumental compositions. The restoration of mural painting influenced the materials he learned, such as tempera and encaustic, which were fundamental techniques in the XVI century. Another influence was ovohispanic architecture worked by craftsmen,goldsmiths , stonemasons,and indigenous painters have guided his designs at Santo Domingo de Gizmán, at the tla Verde Antequera in Oaxaca.

“I remember the zoomorphic figures on the walls of the convents, animals that looked like quimeras, saltimbanquis with flowers and baroque ornaments.”

“The people that come from indigenous communities learn about ancient cosmogonies, ancient beliefs and oral traditions regarding the water, the land, and the agriculture set the rhythm of life. They teach us along with the teachings of the old Tlacuilos, that wisdom is marked by the stars, it resonates like an echo of the landscapes and the water.”