Ana Gomez de Leon

Ana Gomez de Leon

Carmen Parra

Carmen Parra

Charles Hinojosa

Charles Hinojosa

Daniel Lezama

Daniel Lezama

Miguel Soler-RoigGallery Weekend

Miguel Soler-Roig

Gallery Weekend

Emiliano Gironella Parra

Emiliano Gironella Parra

Gabriel Macotela

Gabriel Macotela

Guillermo Kahlo Alcala

Guillermo Kahlo Alcala

Guillermo Olguin

Guillermo Olguin

Guillermo Pacheco

Guillermo Pacheco

Manuel Gaona

Manuel Gaona

Maria Jose Lavin

Maria Jose Lavin

Paloma Torres

Paloma Torres

Sebastian

Sebastian

Sergio Hernandez

Sergio Hernandez

Sueraya Shaheen

Sueraya Shaheen

  • Ana Gomez de Leon
  • Carmen Parra
  • Charles Hinojosa
  • Daniel Lezama
  • Miguel Soler-RoigGallery Weekend
  • Emiliano Gironella Parra
  • Gabriel Macotela
  • Guillermo Kahlo Alcala
  • Guillermo Olguin
  • Guillermo Pacheco
  • Manuel Gaona
  • Maria Jose Lavin
  • Paloma Torres
  • Sebastian
  • Sergio Hernandez
  • Sueraya Shaheen
  • Ana Gomez de Leon

    (Mexico City, 1991)

    Ana Gómez de León studied art at CATS Art School in Cambridge, England where she discovered photography was one of her passions, which led her to formally study this discipline at Lesley University in Boston, Massachussets. In her work, she plays with the idea of anonymity as an expression of urban cultura, as a mask that hides human emotion. This idea in conjunction with her aesthetic sensibility, results in a humanised and poetic environment.

  • Carmen Parra

    (Mexico City, Mexico — 1944)

    She has had artistic studies in different disciplines, such as theatre, graphic design, painting and music. Her current premise is to make a revival of New Spanish aesthetics by rescuing the iconography of angels, archangels, eagles, butterflies and flowers and using artistic forms such as altars and altarpieces through her personal re-interpretation.

  • Charles Hinojosa

    (Mexico City, 1992)

    Charles Hinojosa is a self-taught photographer. She reflects on what it means to be a millennial woman in Mexico City. This gender-focused introspection is what gave way to IMPASSE, her first individual exhibition, which was shown in Flux·Zone.

  • Daniel Lezama

    (Mexico City, Mexico — 1968)

    Recurring to a naturalist aesthetic in his work, Lezama takes up the Mexican nationalist discourse and reinterprets it in contemporary contexts. He pays homage to works of Mexican artists of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Lezama is influenced by the narrative ways of authors such as Rubens or Goya, as well as by the aesthetics of masters of light and shadow, such as Caravaggio.

  • Miguel Soler-Roig

    Gallery Weekend

    (Barcelona, 1961)

    His education has been influenced by the Bauhaus and the new Swiss typographic style. He studied at the Basel Art School. Subsequently completed a Masters in Fine Arts at Rhode Island School of Design in Providence. For several years has been living and working in New York, and after his return to Spain he continued his studies in photography, completing a Master of Art in Photography at the European Institute of Design in Madrid (IED), and numerous international photography workshops.

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  • Emiliano Gironella Parra

    (Mexico City, Mexico — 1972)

    Emiliano Gironella studied visual arts at the Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan, USA. He resorts to engraving, direct wood carvings, bronze sculptures and methacrylate castings. Heir of a legacy of artists, his themes have fluctuated between bullfighting —influence of his father, Alberto Gironella—, tributes to contemporary artists, and his current concern: the havoc wrecked in Mexican society as a result of the violence experienced in the country.

  • Gabriel Macotela

    (Guadalajara, Mexico — 1954)

    Multidisciplinary artist whose main premise is that art should have a social commitment. He was a member of the Suma group in the seventies, where he questioned the media and spaces for art exhibition. He was also part of the generation that promoted conceptual art in Mexico and experimentation with unconventional materials, such as rubbish. His painting tends towards abstraction and his sculptural work to labyrinthine models that rethink the concept of “city".

  • Guillermo Kahlo Alcala

    (Mexico, 1961)

    Faces that keep us company, eyes that return our gaze, gestures that stay with us in their frankness or subtlety. Throughout history, the great portraits are eloquent of the moment and situation of the people who were captured, of the talent of those who executed them. They are invested in their time and they transcend it.

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  • Guillermo Olguin

    (Mexico City — 1969)

    Although known as a painter, Olguín is interested in experimenting with different mediums. He has collaborated with photographers to intervene their film negatives, as well as for the realisation of video art. He explores concepts such as travel, pagan rites and mythology.

  • Guillermo Pacheco

    (Sinaloa, Mexico — 1971)

    In his work, Pacheco uses elements of contemporary architecture to represent the Mexican countryside, specifically that related to the harvest of mezcal. He extracts the pigments he uses himself from organic matter and uses his hands as brushes. He combines images with text, which he attributes to the Japanese influence he had from one of his professors when he studied art in Oaxaca.

  • Manuel Gaona

  • Maria Jose Lavin

    (Mexico City, Mexico — 1957)

    Mexican sculptor who experiments with materials and techniques. With an influence from her participation in restoration projects, she began working with bandages and plaster as a medium, as well as with laser cuts made on leather, where she plays, not only with the object, but also with the shadows projected by the light projected through the perforations in the material.

  • Paloma Torres

    (Mexico City, Mexico — 1960)

    She studied a degree in Visual Arts and a Master's degree in Colour Printmaking, both at UNAM's Escuela Nacional de Artes Plasticas. Likewise, she took courses in colour gravure in the Atelier 17 of S. W. Hayter in Paris. Her sculpture is tinted with architecture to give way to a dance between the concept that a building projects and the tangible sculptural material.

  • Sebastian

    (Chihuahua, Mexico — 1947)

    Sculptor who makes use of hard sciences such as mathematics and geometry in his work. He is interested in participatory art, a concept that is present in works such as his series of transformable sculptures as well as in his urban monumental sculpture.

  • Sergio Hernandez

    (Oaxaca, Mexico — 1957)

    His artistic production includes a diversity of mediums such as engraving, sculpture, ceramics, painting and drawing. The artist works with materials that present a dichotomy: he uses snakeskins and flowers to make prints on lead plates.

  • Sueraya Shaheen

    (Beirut, 1965)

    Sueraya Shaheen graduated from a Bachelors degree in Fine Arts at Corcoran college of Art and Design in Washington DC in 1994. She worked as a freelance photojournalist for twenty, which influenced the style of portraiture that she uses in her work. She had to flee her country in 1975 due to the outbreak of the Lebanese Civil War. Since then, she has lived in Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States, where she is currently based in.

  • Ana Gomez de Leon
  • Carmen Parra
  • Charles Hinojosa
  • Daniel Lezama
  • Miguel Soler-RoigGallery Weekend
  • Emiliano Gironella Parra
  • Gabriel Macotela
  • Guillermo Kahlo Alcala
  • Guillermo Olguin
  • Guillermo Pacheco
  • Manuel Gaona
  • Maria Jose Lavin
  • Paloma Torres
  • Sebastian
  • Sergio Hernandez
  • Sueraya Shaheen